Product Details

TWENTYNINE PALMS (2003)

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"Will blow your mind! Sexy, ultra-violent and sweet, it will infiltrate your brain long after you've seen it." New York Post "A true scandal. Mesmerising. Shocking." The Onion "Compelling and extreme" The New York Times "One of the most uncompromised films I've ever seen" Premiere "A gem. TWENTYNINE PALMS is a love poem to the way we look at the world" Slant


More Details
Catalogue No. ACC0041
SRP A$24.95
APN 9333723000417
DVD Release Date 2 Aug 2006
Director Bruno Dumont
Producer Allen Bain
Cast Yekaterina Golubeva, David Wissak
Genre Drama
Rating R18+ (High level sexual violence and sex scenes)
Run Time 119 minutes
Visual Format 2.35:1
Audio Format 5.1 Dolby Digital
Language English/French (Optional English subtitles)
Special Features Widescreen 2.35 Original aspect ratio Dolby Digital 5.1 surround sound Trailer Director's Statement Accent Trailers
Quotes "Will blow your mind! Sexy, ultra-violent and sweet, it will infiltrate your brain long after you've seen it." New York Post "A true scandal. Mesmerising. Shocking." The Onion "Compelling and extreme" The New York Times "One of the most uncompromised films I've ever seen" Premiere "A gem. TWENTYNINE PALMS is a love poem to the way we look at the world" Slant
Awards --

Synopsis
Award-winning filmmaker Bruno Dumont's devastating TWENTYNINE PALMS is a mesmerizing story of love, sex and evil set deep in the California desert. Dumont's self-professed "experimental horror film" follows a couple in the throes of a torrid love affair as they journey through the blazing heat of the Mojave desert. David (David Wissack), an American photographer, and his Russian girlfriend Katia (Katia Golubeva), are scouting locations for an upcoming photo shoot. During the day, they drive through some of the wildest, most bizarre desert landscapes, while at night, they continually argue and have raw, primal sex. Eventually, their luck runs out.

TWENTYNINE PALMS is a jaw-droppingly brash work of art. The result is a truly challenging film, which will confound and anger as many viewers as it stimulates and thrills. Like Lars von Trier's DOGVILLE, TWENTYNINE PALMS will also be accused of anti-Americanism, but Dumont's message is clearly a universal one. He uses a sparse yet familiar American landscape to subvert viewer's expectations, building to one of the most shocking finales in cinematic history.
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